Class of Covid is out of control: Two-thirds of teachers say pupil behaviour has got WORSE

Class of Covid is out of control: Two-thirds of teachers say pupil behaviour has got WORSE since they returned to school after six months off

  • A survey of teachers found 69 per cent believed children were more naughty
  • Six per cent who had seen behaviour worsen ‘hugely’ and a quarter ‘noticeably’
  • Only 31 per cent of 10,000 school staff polled reported experiencing no dip
  • The bad behaviour has been blamed on the six-month period of school closures 

Children are misbehaving more after spending months out of the classroom during lockdown, according to an overwhelming majority of teachers.

More than two-thirds of school staff claim that pupils have been playing up since returning to lessons last month.

A survey of teachers, their assistants and school leaders by Tes magazine found that 69 per cent believed children were more naughty – including six per cent who had seen behaviour worsen ‘hugely’.

Children are misbehaving more after spending months out of the classroom during lockdown, according to an overwhelming majority of teachers (file photo)

A quarter of respondents said behaviour standards had noticeably slipped and 38 per cent they had had fell slightly.

Only 31 per cent of the 6,714 school staff polled reported experiencing no slump in behaviour.

The bad behaviour has been blamed on the six-month hiatus when schools were shut to stem the spread of the virus.

Some schools provided remote lessons and educational packs during lockdown, but others left parents to set most of the work,

Pupils are reportedly struggling to swing back into a daily routine while coronavirus fears are also preying on them.

More than two-thirds of school staff claim that pupils have been playing up since returning to lessons last month (file photo)

More than two-thirds of school staff claim that pupils have been playing up since returning to lessons last month (file photo)

General secretary of the NAHT union Paul Whiteman suggested ‘anxieties about coronavirus manifest themselves as behaviour challenges’.

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders said: ‘These are very difficult circumstances, with students having to follow safety processes and timetabling arrangements which are very different from school life in normal times, and in many cases having spent a long time out of school during the national lockdown.’

One respondent claimed that pupils who have started at a new school are finding it particularly tough. 

Of Year 7 pupils, they told the Tes survey: ‘They are struggling as they have to sit in one room all day, can’t make friends easily and can’t run around at lunch time.’

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