Prince Harry ‘could face telling off from the Queen’ as Palace staff told to prepare for his return

Prince Harry ‘could face a telling off from the Queen’ amid concerns over his public comments about US politics as Palace staff ‘are told to prepare for his return to the UK within weeks’

  • It is thought staff have been told to ready Frogmore Cottage for duke’s arrival 
  • Queen likely to meet him at Windsor after she returned to resume engagements
  • But it comes as royal experts warned Harry had ‘burnt significant bridges’ 

Prince Harry could face a scolding by the Queen amid concerns over his public comments about US politics as royal staff prepare for him to return to the UK, according to reports.

It is thought that Palace staff have been told to ready Frogmore Cottage for the imminent return of the duke – without mention of Meghan Markle.

The Queen, 94, is likely to meet with Harry at her ‘HMS Bubble’ at Windsor after she returned in order to resume audiences and small engagements. 

But his alleged visit comes after royal experts warned that Harry had been ‘burnt significant bridges beyond repair’ after he spoke out about the upcoming American election.

Prince Harry could face a scolding by the Queen amid concerns over his public comments about US politics as royal staff prepare for him to return to the UK without mention of Meghan Markle, according to reports

A source told The Sun: ‘Staff at Windsor have been told to prepare for the possibility Harry could come back.

‘They are told that it could be within weeks but Meghan’s name was not mentioned. 

‘There are all sorts of issues to speak about — not only his political statements but also his visa situation in the US.

‘Even though he would have to isolate for two weeks, the estate is large enough for talks in a socially distanced way.’   

The news of his return comes after Harry handed over a ‘substantial sum’ in order to pay rent and clear the bill for £2.4million taxpayer-funded renovations carried out on the couple’s UK home. 

The Queen, 94, is likely to meet with Harry at her 'HMS Bubble' at Windsor after she returned in order to resume audiences and small engagements

The Queen, 94, is likely to meet with Harry at her ‘HMS Bubble’ at Windsor after she returned in order to resume audiences and small engagements

But one royal expert has claimed that Meghan and Harry, who now live in a $14million mansion in Santa Barbara, with their one-year-old son Archie, have ‘burnt significant bridges beyond repair’.

The couple appear to ‘not be bothered’ by their decision to leave the Firm and move to the US, Penny Junor wrote in the Mirror.

The biographer observed that while Prince Harry may improve his relationship with his brother Prince William – it’s unlikely Meghan will ever want to return to the institution.

She suggested the former actress, who has been vocal in recent weeks in urging Americans to vote, couldn’t achieve her desire to change the world while working as a senior member of the royal family.

‘In the past few months, Harry and Meghan have burnt some significant bridges that may be beyond repair,’ Penny said.

‘Right now, that doesn’t seem to bother them. And I can’t see Meghan ever wanting a way back. What she discovered in her brief spell as a working member, is the British royal family is no place for someone with political ambition.

Prince Harry 'could face telling off from the Queen' as Palace staff told to prepare for his return 1

Congressman Jason Smith of Missouri demanded that the British government ask the Queen to strip Meghan and Harry of their royal titles for 'interfering' in the upcoming American election

Congressman Jason Smith of Missouri demanded that the British government ask the Queen to strip Meghan and Harry of their royal titles for ‘interfering’ in the upcoming American election

‘This centuries-old institution provides an unparalleled platform for charitable work – to change and improve people’s lives – but it is not the springboard for changing the world – however burning and evident the need.’

However, Penny suggested that Harry doesn’t have the same political ambitions and instead his passion lies with helping disadvantaged people.

She added that it’s likely ‘he will find his way back’ one day.

It comes after Congressman Jason Smith of Missouri demanded that the British government ask the Queen to strip Meghan and Harry of their royal titles for ‘interfering’ in the upcoming American election – claiming they are using them to influence voters.

Harry, who has netted a £112million Netflix deal with Meghan, has now been in the US for more than 183 days, which means he could also be liable to pay tax there. 

Representatives for Harry and Meghan have been approached for comment. 

How British royals are expected to keep out of politics  

Under Britain’s constitutional monarchy, powers which theoretically belong to the Queen – such as appointing ministers and approving legislation – are exercised in her name by political leaders. 

This system means that political decisions are taken by the elected government rather than unelected royals, while keeping the monarchy as a symbol of the British state and its traditions. 

The royals’ political neutrality, which the Queen has scrupulously observed for 68 years, is key to maintaining this balance and to preserving the monarchy’s popularity. 

A YouGov poll earlier this year found majority support among both Conservative and Labour voters as well as Brexiteers and Europhiles for maintaining the British monarchy.  

The Queen’s uncle King Edward VIII had to abdicate in 1936 because the government refused to support his planned marriage to American divorcee Wallis Simpson – fatally compromising his neutrality.   

While there is no law explicitly preventing the royal family from voting in UK elections, doing so would be an unacceptable breach of protocol.   

The Queen holds weekly conversations with her prime ministers and she is entitled to ‘advise and warn’ them when necessary, but the nature of her advice is never made public.  

Even her guarded comment that voters should ‘think very carefully about the future’ ahead of the 2014 Scottish independence referendum was seen as an unusual intervention.  

Prince Charles is known for writing lengthy letters to ministers on policy subjects such as agriculture, some of which were made public in 2015. 

William and Kate have also spoken out on the environment, launching a prize to tackle climate issues last year. 

Princess Diana – who like Harry and Meghan became semi-detached from the monarchy – was known for her campaigning on land mines, once allegedly describing the UK government’s policy as ‘hopeless’. 

Her involvement sparked criticism from some Conservative MPs, but the Labour government that took office shortly before her death was more favourable to her campaign.  

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