Pete Evans’ fans TRICKED into thinking he won a genuine award celebrating his controversial views

‘What a badge of honour!’ Conspiracy theorist Pete Evans’ fans are TRICKED into thinking he won a genuine award celebrating his controversial views on COVID-19 and anti-vaccination

Fans of conspiracy theorist Pete Evans have been tricked into thinking he had won a genuine award celebrating his controversial views on COVID-19 and anti-vaccination.

On Monday, the former My Kitchen Rules judge shared the news he had won the 2020 Bent Spoon Award. which is ‘awarded annually to the perpetrator of the most preposterous piece of paranormal or pseudo-scientific piffle’.

While the 47-year-old dubbed the win as a ‘badge of honour’ on Facebook, his impressionable social media followers failed to realise he was being sarcastic and left him congratulatory messages instead. 

Joke’s on you! Fans of conspiracy theorist Pete Evans were tricked into thinking he had won a genuine award celebrating his controversial views on COVID-19 and anti-vaccination

Addressing a headline which read: ‘Paleo Pete Evans wins Bent Spoon for second time,’ the impassioned anti-vaxxer wrote: ‘Badge of honour. Thanks team ✌️❤️’.

He made it clear that it wasn’t an award worth celebrating for him as he mockingly relayed a line from the piece: ‘While there were a number of nominations for this year’s Spoon, Evans was the hands-down choice among Skeptical groups around Australia. #thereisnospoon’.

However, his dedicated fan base failed to get the memo as one enthused: ‘Congratulations Pete!! Great recognition of all you do’.

Another gushed: ‘I’m impressed….well done Pete!’ while someone else echoed: ‘Keep up the good work Pete’.  

'There is no spoon': On Monday, the former My Kitchen Rules judge shared the news that he had won the 2020 Bent Spoon Award which is 'awarded annually to the perpetrator of the most preposterous piece of paranormal or pseudo-scientific piffle'

‘There is no spoon’: On Monday, the former My Kitchen Rules judge shared the news that he had won the 2020 Bent Spoon Award which is ‘awarded annually to the perpetrator of the most preposterous piece of paranormal or pseudo-scientific piffle’

Sarcastic: Pete made it clear that it wasn't an award worth celebrating for him as he mockingly relayed a line from the piece

Sarcastic: Pete made it clear that it wasn’t an award worth celebrating for him as he mockingly relayed a line from the piece

A fourth added: ‘Stop showing off Pete, I want a badge of honour too’ while a fifth wrote: ‘Congratulations, it’s good to be recognised’.

According to the Australian Skeptics’ website, Pete has won the 2020 Bent Spoon Award for ‘the promotion of the pseudoscientific non-medical BioCharger and continuing his anti-vaccination position’.

Pete has not been without his controversies this year, with his beliefs around the coronavirus pandemic being highly-scrutinised.

In July, he claimed that COVID-19 was a ‘f**king hoax’ and that the pandemic ‘doesn’t compare to what is happening in the world on a large scale’.

In April, he was fined $25,000 for promoting the Biocharger and its effects on the coronavirus.

'Great recognition!' However, Pete's dedicated fan base failed to get the memo

‘Great recognition!’ However, Pete’s dedicated fan base failed to get the memo

Conspiracy theorist: According to the Australian Skeptics' website , Pete has won the 2020 Bent Spoon Award for 'the promotion of the pseudoscientific non-medical BioCharger and continuing his anti-vaccination position'

Conspiracy theorist: According to the Australian Skeptics’ website , Pete has won the 2020 Bent Spoon Award for ‘the promotion of the pseudoscientific non-medical BioCharger and continuing his anti-vaccination position’

Pete has also been scrutinised for his dangerous anti-vaccination views. He recently claimed he was not an anti-vaxxer, but was instead ‘pro-choice’ and ‘pro-safe vac’ – terms that incorrectly suggest some vaccines are not safe.

Anti-vaxxers spread conspiracy theories with no basis in scientific fact. They claim that ‘boosting’ the immune system through diet, supplements and sunlight can make people immune to certain diseases, which is completely false.

Before vaccination campaigns in the 1960s and ’70s, diseases such as tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough killed thousands of children, whereas today in Australia, dying from one of these is extremely rare.

Pete first won The Bent Spoon Award in 2015, where his ‘diet promotions, campaigns against fluoridation and support of anti-vaccinationists’ helped him beat stiff competition.

Second time win: Pete first won The Bent Spoon Award in 2015, where his 'diet promotions, campaigns against fluoridation and support of anti-vaccinationists' helped him beat stiff competition

Second time win: Pete first won The Bent Spoon Award in 2015, where his ‘diet promotions, campaigns against fluoridation and support of anti-vaccinationists’ helped him beat stiff competition