Putin security deputy’s assassination threat to Zelensky: Top Kremlin official says Ukraine leader ‘is unlikely to live to an old age’ after it was revealed he has survived five attempts on his life

Vladimir Putin‘s security deputy has issued a chilling warning that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky ‘is unlikely to have a chance of living to old age’.

The sickening new threat from Russian ex-president Dmitry Medvedev follows Zelensky’s revelation that he has already survived at least five Kremlin assassination attempts.

Medvedev – now Putin’s deputy on the Russian security council – said: ‘All this cheap bravado also evokes one very obvious thought.

‘With such powerful ‘prophecies’, this fool is unlikely to have a chance of living to old age. Thoughts are sometimes material.’

Zelensky, 45, had claimed Ukraine‘s intelligence services have foiled repeated bids to kill him since the February 24 invasion

The sickening new threat from Russian ex-president Dmitry Medvedev (pictured) follows Zelensky’s revelation that he has already survived at least five Kremlin assassination attempts

Zelensky, 45, had claimed Ukraine 's intelligence services have foiled repeated bids to kill him since the February 24 invasion

Zelensky, 45, had claimed Ukraine ‘s intelligence services have foiled repeated bids to kill him since the February 24 invasion

The Ukrainian president also revealed that the Kremlin is plotting to topple him before the end of the year in a mission apparently dubbed ‘Maidan 3’ – a reference to the Euromaidan revolution of 2014 which sparked the Russian annexation of Crimea and led to the outbreak of war. 

Zelensky outlined Putin’s sinister bids to kill him, saying: ‘The first one is very interesting, when it is the first time, and after that it is just like Covid.

‘First of all people don’t know what to do with it and it’s looking very scary.

‘And then after that, it is just intelligence just sharing with you detail that one more group came to Ukraine to [attempt] this.’

Asked how many attempts Russia had made to assassinate him, he said: ‘I don’t know, really I don’t know. I think not less [than] five, six…not less.

‘They will use any, any instruments they have.’

In his rambling and barely comprehensible post on Telegram, 58-year-old Medvedev – who is believed to eye a return to the Kremlin if death or sickness force Putin out – said of Zelensky: ‘Lord, what a wretched thing this Bandera scarecrow is.’ 

Medvedev was Russian president from 2008 to 2012 when Putin served as his prime minister.

He then handed the top job back to the Russian dictator.

It comes as Germany on Tuesday unveiled another large military aid package for Ukraine during an unannounced visit to Kyiv by the defence minister that coincided with the 10th anniversary of the historic Maidan protests.

European Union leader Charles Michel and Moldovan leader Maia Sandu were also in the capital, Kyiv, becoming the latest officials to throw their political clout behind Ukraine during surprise trips.

A flurry of visits from senior Western officials have sought to reassure Kyiv of more military support, as the world’s attention shifts to the Middle East and questions emerge over US funding for Ukraine.

Ukrainian soldiers fire artillery at their fighting position in the direction of Bakhmut, Ukraine, on 18 November

Ukrainian soldiers fire artillery at their fighting position in the direction of Bakhmut, Ukraine, on 18 November

Ukrainian soldier carries a shell in his fighting position in the direction of Bakhmut, Ukraine, on 18 November

Ukrainian soldier carries a shell in his fighting position in the direction of Bakhmut, Ukraine, on 18 November 

Ukrainian tank crew members of the 21st Mechanized Brigade chat as one stands in the hatch of a German battle tank Leopard 2A5 near the front line in an undisclosed location in the Lyman direction of the Donetsk region, on Tuesday

Ukrainian tank crew members of the 21st Mechanized Brigade chat as one stands in the hatch of a German battle tank Leopard 2A5 near the front line in an undisclosed location in the Lyman direction of the Donetsk region, on Tuesday 

The German package – worth 1.3 billion euros (1.1 billion) and including four further IRIS T-SLM air defence systems as well as artillery ammunition – was unveiled by Defence Minister Boris Pistorius after talks with his Ukrainian counterpart, Rustem Umerov, in Kyiv.

‘I am here again, firstly to pledge further support but also to express our solidarity and deep bond and also our admiration for the courageous, brave and costly fight that is being waged here,’ Pistorius said earlier when he laid flowers at Maidan square in central Kyiv.

Michel, the president of the European Council, announced his arrival in Kyiv by posting on social media a picture of himself getting off a train.

‘Good to be back in Kyiv among friends,’ he wrote ahead of expected meetings, including with President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Zelensky earlier this week met the head of the Pentagon, who announced another $100million  in US military aid, and last week hosted UK Foreign Secretary David Cameron, who promised continued British backing.

The visits come in the wake of a disappointing Ukrainian counteroffensive in the south and east of the country that Kyiv launched this summer after building up stockpiles of Western weapons.

Ukraine has nonetheless claimed recently to have recaptured several kilometres (miles) of land on the east bank of the Dnipro river, which is the de facto front line in the south of the country.

Russia’s defence minister dismissed those claims on Tuesday saying his troops had thwarted Ukrainian attempts to land on the occupied bank in the Kherson region, and claiming Kyiv’s army had suffered ‘colossal losses’.

The Tuesday visits, which also included an announced trip by Moldovan leader Sandu, fell on the 10th anniversary of massive pro-democracy demonstrations in Kyiv that Zelensky linked to Russia’s invasion.

The protest movement – in which around 100 civilians died in violent clashes with security forces in the capital – ultimately led to the ouster of Kremlin-backed president Viktor Yanukovych.

‘The first victory in today’s war took place. A victory against indifference. A victory of courage. The victory of the Revolution of Dignity,’ Zelensky said in a statement marking the anniversary of the months-long protest movement.

Ukrainian soldiers fire artillery at their fighting position in the direction of Bakhmut, Ukraine, on 18 November

Ukrainian soldiers fire artillery at their fighting position in the direction of Bakhmut, Ukraine, on 18 November 

Rescuer works on the side of a hospital which was heavily damaged by a Russian missile strike, amid Russia's attack on Ukraine, in the town of Selydove, Donetsk region, Ukraine, on Tuesday

Rescuer works on the side of a hospital which was heavily damaged by a Russian missile strike, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, in the town of Selydove, Donetsk region, Ukraine, on Tuesday 

The Maidan protests erupted in late 2013 when Yanukovych ditched an association agreement trade deal with the EU.

The protests precipitated separatist fighting in the east of the country.

Zelensky praised his country’s progress towards gaining EU membership since Russian forces launched a fully-fledged invasion in February 2022.

‘Year after year, step by step, we do our best to ensure that our star shines in the circle of stars on the EU flag, which symbolises the unity of the peoples of Europe. The star of Ukraine,’ he said.

The EU’s executive commission recommended earlier this month opening formal membership talks with Ukraine and Moldova, and suggested that the bloc’s 27 member states should grant Georgia candidate status.

The Kremlin however described the Maidan protests as an attempt to topple the government with the backing of foreign powers.

‘It was a coup. It was an overthrow of the authorities that was sponsored from abroad. Things need to be called by their names,’ Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on Tuesday.

Valentyna Bilan, who took part in the Maidan protests, told AFP she felt like ‘the Ukrainian people woke up’ the day the demonstrations began.

‘They realised that we are not some kind of cattle, that they cannot beat our children and can’t have everything decided for us,’ she said in central Kyiv.

‘I met the best people in the world then.’

Peskov meanwhile said Russia’s goal was to push ahead with its invasion of Ukraine, after last year announcing the unilateral annexation of four Ukrainian territories, over which it still does not have full military control.

The United Nations meanwhile announced on Tuesday that more than 10,000 people, including more than 560 children, had been killed and over 18,500 wounded since Russia invaded.

The UN Human Rights Monitoring Mission in Ukraine noted that the real figure was likely to be ‘significantly’ higher, given complications in verifying deaths.

Leave a Comment